Archive for the ‘Nature’ Category

Melting on the roof of the world, Tibet.

I follow environmental and sustainability news fairly closely (alright, not as closely as I’d like to given a work schedule) and I tend to be reasonably well-informed.  However, this particular article brought me up short. It showed me how little we really know about what is going on in the world, how few people appreciate it, and why they need to.  An area of the world that is difficult to access, that we in the US and the west don’t understand well, that impacts billions (with a “B”) of people, is having its own crisis.

What do we do if Tibet goes dry, and takes the Mekong, Yellow and Yangtze rivers with it? We don’t see it, but the results could be staggering in terms of geopolitical stability.

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https://www.chinadialogue.net/blog/7422-Tibetan-plateau-faces-massive-ecosystem-shift-/en

https://www.chinadialogue.net/article/show/single/en/9654-Source-of-Mekong-Yellow-and-Yangtze-rivers-drying-up

 

 

Winter felled

Marked in summer, demise foretold; Cut down at last, in a season cold

No more shade upon my walk; no more place for birds to talk

A part of the street for 20 years; Passed away with no shed tears

Nothing planted in their place to grow; Nothing to improve the barren show

It takes years and years to grow a tree; Who will see it, I fear ….. not me

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Time change

Even though we’re on the upslope of daylight, even though we are gaining precious minutes each week, even though I have so far survived this….I still feel the need to rail against Standard Time and mourn the loss of Daylight Savings Time.  Because I need to save all the daylight I can, have it touch me all that I can.  I don’t know the full story of the creating of daylight savings time and standard time. But it’s time for it to stop. Let’s do Daylight Savings and keep it there, year round.

The world has changed considerably since Summer Time, as Daylight Savings Time was first known, was introduced.  Things have even changed since we codified it in the Energy Policy Act of 2005.  At one point it made sense based on how we lived and the condition of the developed world.  Technology and society have moved on and the reasons for supporting the constant switching of time are no longer so valid. We now have a 24-7 existence where people do everything from telework (thanks to the web) to shop and even go to the gym at all hours.  I’ve seen the Washington Beltway as busy at 11 pm and 1 am as it is at 11 am and 1 pm. We have designed energy-efficient facilities, use LED lights, and drive higher efficiency vehicles.  The idea of saving energy….has evaporated like frost in the sunlight.  A working world that was ruled by 9-5 schedules is different from what we have now.  Now it’s ruled by 24-7, and people do everything at all hours.

The time difference doesn’t help with farming and crops.  We have lost the society where there were large number of people on the land, and farming was a manual chore.  Now we don’t have large portions of the population living on farms and rising up early to milk cows and till the earth anymore. Farms are still important, they just are just significantly more automated and mechanized, and less impacted by the clock.

The time switching doesn’t help protect kids going to school.  The most dangerous time for pedestrians and for accidents is when the clock changes and we have a sudden shift in light and dark and twilight.  And now, because of football, band, aftercare and numerous other activities, they tend to go home in the dark instead of leave from home in the morning in the dark.

Finally…..it screws with my SAD and ruins months of the year for me (what?….why yes, yes, it IS all about me!).  Seasonal Affective Disorder is more widely recognized and understood, more widely diagnosed than ever before. It is the depression that comes from lack of light and disruption of rhythms, and the shift of the day only brings the dark of night upon us faster and faster.

Yes I’m grateful for the extra minutes I’ve been gaining these past couple of weeks.  Yes, it helps with my mood and my exercise; with my energy and productivity.  So I say “Down with Falling Back!”  Change the rules.  Have Congress do something useful AND unify the country (since there are a couple of states that don’t participate in this Ponzi scheme of the clock.  Stay with Spring Forward….do it in the spring and keep it there!

Death Marks

I had first seen the signs, but forgot them.

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I had passed by the signs on my walks a couple of times, and didn’t pay any attention to them.

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And then it hit me.  Death marks.  The trees that graced my walk path were going to be removed.

By paint on the trunk, and marks on the road, the tree is marked for removal.

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It is, undoubtedly, due to the Emerald Ash Borer.  We’ve lost a lot of trees in the region, and in Columbia, from the pest.  I understand the need to remove them, although the change in the view of my path will be sad to see.  It was right beside the first tree in the first picture that I saw my first (and only) in-person pileated woodpecker.

I suspect my only real compliant with the process is wondering, since it has likely been known for a couple of years that the trees would eventually have to go, why new ones weren’t planted sooner, to give them a little time to grow, to give them a little shade.

It does make me more attuned to the issue of biological diversity.  For history has shown the effects of a dependency on a particular species, whether it is the potato, the elm, or the ash.  And perhaps it should be considered when we think about the other crops of corn, wheat, rice, bananas.  How dependent are we on a single sources, which can be susceptible to a particular disease….or biological weapon.

For now, I know I will have a tree-less promenade next spring and summer, and a significant change in my shade.

#HoCoBlogs

Ned Talks :)

Yes…that was  a deliberate play on the Ted Talks title 😀

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The Howard County Library is once again having a good speaker session at the LEED Gold Miller Branch on Thursday October 20.  Local author and naturalist Ned Tillman will be speaking  on “Saving the Places We Love”, his second book (third is in the works!).  I haven’t read this one, but his first book “The Chesapeake Watershed” was a great multifaceted talk about the history, geology, biology and function of the Chesapeake Bay and the watershed that feed it.  I particularly like the discussion of the Patapsco River Valley from a natural and historical perspective. It is not a great stretch to read that book and understand how the terrible Ellicott City flood of this summer came to be so devastating.

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I’d recommend coming out early…if you haven’t walked on the green roof of the Library, it is a gorgeous pieces of extensive green roof, wonderfully planted and tied into the patio, and the interior carpet to evoke the waters of the valley.

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more bees please — EAT UP

Standing on the roof of SHARE Food Program in north Philadelphia, the audible hum of bee wing vibration is hypnotizing. Drones dart out of their hives to forage for pollen and nectar, others sluggishly return with…

via more bees please — EAT UP

Aquatic humor

After the last week or so, I thought a lighter, more humorous post was needed 🙂  Go into the weekend with a smile and giggle.

The article that caught my attention was from the Daily Mail.  As I have done on a couple of occasions, there isn’t really a deep message, just something amazing and colorful and good for a smile 🙂

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