Death Marks

I had first seen the signs, but forgot them.

cropped

I had passed by the signs on my walks a couple of times, and didn’t pay any attention to them.

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And then it hit me.  Death marks.  The trees that graced my walk path were going to be removed.

By paint on the trunk, and marks on the road, the tree is marked for removal.

tree           road

It is, undoubtedly, due to the Emerald Ash Borer.  We’ve lost a lot of trees in the region, and in Columbia, from the pest.  I understand the need to remove them, although the change in the view of my path will be sad to see.  It was right beside the first tree in the first picture that I saw my first (and only) in-person pileated woodpecker.

I suspect my only real compliant with the process is wondering, since it has likely been known for a couple of years that the trees would eventually have to go, why new ones weren’t planted sooner, to give them a little time to grow, to give them a little shade.

It does make me more attuned to the issue of biological diversity.  For history has shown the effects of a dependency on a particular species, whether it is the potato, the elm, or the ash.  And perhaps it should be considered when we think about the other crops of corn, wheat, rice, bananas.  How dependent are we on a single sources, which can be susceptible to a particular disease….or biological weapon.

For now, I know I will have a tree-less promenade next spring and summer, and a significant change in my shade.

#HoCoBlogs

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3 responses to this post.

  1. 😦 I understand. It’s just sad.

    Reply

  2. Posted by hmunro on December 8, 2016 at 8:43 pm

    We’ve lost a significant part of our urban canopy in my city to emerald ash borers, Jeff — and although I’ve seen countless trees get the “death mark,” I’ve never gotten used to the sadness of it. You’re right that it does underscore the importance of biological diversity, and also the fundamental fragility of life. I do hope your city will learn from this, though, and that it will plant a variety of species to replace its dying ash trees.

    Reply

  3. […] in summer, demise foretold; Cut down at last, in a season […]

    Reply

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